Rounding some stuff up from before the holiday as well as this morning.

  • An Australian court has ruled that simply linking to copyrighted material is enough to be an offense.
  • Jackie and Ben show how one blogger’s efforts led to mainstream media coverage of some controversial cameras in downtown Chicago. That coverage then resulted in the cameras being removed.
  • Shel Holtz is worried about the amount of spam pitches he and others are going to get thanks to Umbria’s new system of selling batches of URLs of bloggers to marketers.
  • Shel also is talking about how old media can actually adapt to the new media world.
  • If you’ve been itching for a chance to work with Joe Jaffe he’s got two ways we all can participate in the creation of his next book.
  • Mack Collier is finding that his “Z-Lister” meme is having exactly the effect he hoped it would and sending new links to some off-the-beaten-path sites whose owners put up consistently good content.
  • An excellent overview of YouTube, both its uses and dangers, from the LA Times.
  • I’ve always been, well let’s just say skeptical of what Microsoft had in mind when it started mucking around with RSS. So I’m not encouraged by the patent filings by the company that have everyone buzzing.
  • Wikipedia’s Jimmy Wales got some money from a group of sources and will be attempting to launch a search engine to rival Google next year. The search wouldn’t be algorithm based but, like Wikipedia, rely on the judgment of the community to determine search results.
  • Andrew Baron is trying to remind people he’s still around.
  • I think Rick Klau from FeedBurner is right. If we can overcome the education gap that exists with RSS it can truly change the way content is delivered. As soon as anyone I know has discovered it they wonder how they ever searched the web without it.
  • Everybody’s speculating that big media companies are lining up to buy AOL or Yahoo!. Yeah, cause the whole AOL/Time Warner thing worked out so fantastically.
  • Business networking site LinkedIn has been valued at $250 million.
  • The New York Times makes some media predictions for 2007.