Key Art Key Changes, Movie Marketing

Key Art Key Changes: Pete’s Dragon, The BFG, The Intervention, Absolutely Fabulous: The Movie

Reaching an audience in the home video market is much different than reaching the theatrical audience. That often means the key art that’s used for home video releases is changed significantly from the one-sheets that were available during the theatrical marketing cycle. What I’m going to try and do is see what those changes are and what they mean for the appeal being made.

Pete’s Dragon

The theatrical posters for Pete’s Dragon were determined not to show Elliot in his entirety, instead focusing on either his knack for hiding or the comforting role he plays for Pete. So the poster campaign here was more concerned with continuing the mystery of the dragon and presenting the scale of his relationship with the boy than anything else.

On home video the designers took a similar approach but changed the perspective, showing Elliot leaning down as Pete reaches out to pet him and show him some affection. By changing things up and showing the dragon’s face it creates a stronger connection with the audience and they don’t risk spoiling anything since the movie’s been out for several months.

The BFG

No change here, the home video cover art of the young girl standing on the toes of the BFG and looking up as a hazy sunset fades in the background is pulled straight from one of the theatrical one-sheets.

The Intervention

Same thing, this is almost an exact recreation of the theatrical poster, just with some of the stripes rearranged.

Absolutely Fabulous: The Movie

The two theatrical one-sheets played up the return of Patsy and Edina as a booze-filled romp, with one showing the two of them riding a bursting champagne bottle like it’s a bar-room bronco. It’s all about showing off the fact that we’re returning right where the series left off, with the two women still in party mode.

It’s the same basic principle on the home video cover, with a close up of the partying pair with the champagne bottle between them and popping while they look ready to get down. There’s not much more to the design, it’s just about creating visual recognition for anyone who sees it on store shelves.

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