• My buddy Rick Klau from Feedburner gets interviewed by Eric Enge about RSS penetration, measurement and other such topics. (CT)
  • Eric Eggertson has some good tips for employers about to bring young adults into the fold. Bottom line: Give them outlets where they can channel their passion, interest and intellect for the corporate good. (CT)
  • Max Kalehoff reminds us that just because people love the content it’s not necessarily true that they love the ads around it. The ads need to work WITH the content, not against it. (CT)
  • Chris Anderson is announcing his latest startup, BookTour.com. He’s being cagey with the details, though, waiting till 6/1 for the official launch. (CT)
  • Kevin Burton says if you want to kill Google you have to go after its advertising revenue. Not exactly new, but I like the way he positions Google against Microsoft.
  • Susan Merrit compares signing up for all sorts of social networks to filling out your dance card in turn of the century (19th to 20th, that is) society. (CT)
  • Jason Calacanis is ranting (rightly, I feel) about his ISP’s decision to block his access to ESPN.com because the sports network isn’t paying them. (CT)
  • Todd is beginning a series of regular profiles on members of his “Power 150” ranking list. (CT)
  • Joe Thornley is live-blogging in his usual fantastic manner from the mesh conference. (CT)
  • Twitter’s Evan Williams is raising some VC funds. All proposals need to be 140 characters or less in length. (CT)
  • The Encyclopedia Britannica is suing navigational system company TomTom, claiming it infringes on copyrights they own. (From TB)
  • As Steve Johnson says, it’s sometimes unfortunate how so much of the online conversation resembles a fraternity common room in its level of discourse. (From TB)