I’ve been busy exploring ways to auction ad-space on my back side in order to raise money to go see the Bears play in the Super Bowl. Any takers? Hello? Is this thing on? –Chris

  • Wikipedia is adding “no follow” tags to the links on its pages, meaning those links aren’t getting the Google Juice they otherwise would.
  • I’m inclined to think that companies have the right to edit factually incorrect Wikipedia entries but the fact that Microsoft went and paid outside bloggers to do so makes me think they felt they were doing something wrong. Microsoft has said it tried going through usual channels but kept being shut out, leading to it employing this tactic. Unfortunately, as Arrington says, there is a fundamental flaw with Wikipedia’s system that is starting to become more and more obvious.
  • The National Institute of Health has also been found to have edited its own Wikipedia entry, bringing it head to head with those who question its science.
  • I honestly can’t believe we’re still talking about LonelyGirl15.
  • As PR people I think we should be ashamed of ourselves everytime we read something like this saying that journalists aren’t hooked into RSS.
  • MySpace makes itself useful by announcing it will begin distributing Amber Alerts.
  • David just about nails the stages of Second Life adoption.
  • Marketing in Second Life could lead to big bucks according to at least one person.
  • The LA Times is enacting a bunch of ideas aimed at making integrating more deeply the online and offline worlds that exist at the paper.
  • When you think, logically, that politics is largely just marketing, it makes sense that it too is becoming a conversation.
  • Mack weighs in on on the reemergence of the “social media is dead” meme.
  • The Washington Post has added a number of outside blogs to its web offerings in an attempt to give it some cred.
  • It’s the people who are already in Second Life who are the most enthusiastic about the world’s future.
  • The new media savviness of the Super Bowl-bound Chicago Bears gets examined by Steve Johnson.
  • Google might be planning a virtual world of its very own.
  • Yahoo has shut down discussion on its news stories because of concerns that too few people were dominating the discussion.